Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Our engineering ratchet

Quietly, over the last thirty years, engineering has become dramatically more efficient and effective.

Insulated glass, cars that don’t break down, keyboards with just the right feel to them… Mechanical, electrical and chemical engineering are all moving faster than ever.

Several factors are at work:

Computer aided design and engineering means that smaller teams can do more, faster.
The internet shows engineers the state of the art immediately, so everyone is working off the latest benchmark.
Markets are more open to levelling up… new innovations that translate to productivity are adopted more easily.
There’s an expectation that better is possible, so organizations are hooked on seeking out better. The ratchet turns the ratchet.
When we’re in the middle of it, we don’t see it. But travel back in time just a bit and you’ll see that few things worked as well as they do now.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Entrepreneurship is not a job

You don’t apply. You don’t get a salary. No one picks you.

Bragging about how much money you’ve raised or what your valuation is a form of job thinking.

Entrepreneurship is a chance to trade a solution to someone who has a problem that needs solving.

Solve more problems, solve bigger problems, solve problems more widely and you’re an entrepreneur.

It’s tempting to industrialize this work, to make it something with rules and bosses and processes. But that’s not the heart of it.

The work is to solve problems in a way that you’re proud of.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The moment of maximum leverage

It’s the moment before it tips, that split second where a little effort can make a big difference.

We wait for this. For the day when participating will truly pay off, for the mechanical advantage that gives us the most impact for our effort.

It’s a myth.

Maximum leverage is the result of commitment, of daily persistence, of gradual and insane and apparently useless effort over time.

When it works, it merely looks like we had good timing.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The pre-mortem

If you want us to take your new proposal seriously, consider including a pre mortem.

Include a detailed analysis of why your project might fail.

Specific weak spots, individuals who need to come on board, assumptions that might not be true…

If you’ve got a track record of successfully predicting specific points of failure before they happen, we’re a lot more likely to trust your judgment next time.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Sprints

How fast can you go?

This is different from the question we ask ourselves most days at work. Careers are often seen as marathons, designed to last as long as we do.

Sprinting—for an hour, a week or a month—develops a different perspective. It helps us understand our upper limit, establishing a performance setting that reminds us of what’s possible.

Not sprinting randomly, erratically, after shiny objects. Sprinting with intent, in a particular direction…

No one can sprint all the time. By its nature, that’s not sprinting. But sprinting now and then is a useful way to learn that we can make an even bigger difference.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

On one foot

Smartphones can hobble us. They connect us, and do it with persistence, drip by drip. But they also push us to make everything fit on a very small screen for a very short time.

Teaching complicated ideas to people on a phone is like trying to teach geography to a bunch of sugared-up kids who just had a triple espresso, while they are standing on one foot being bitten by a swarm of mosquitos.

There could be a direct correlation between smart phone usage and underinformed mass behavior.

Sometimes it’s worth opening up a laptop and slowing down just a bit.

Yes, opening up a laptop might count as slowing down a bit.

Reblogged from: here