Uncategorized

Just enough

There are two paths, really:

“I will serve just enough to make the maximum profit”

or

“I will profit just enough to provide the maximum service.”

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

First, fast and correct

All three would be great.

First… you invent, design, develop and bring to life things that haven’t been done before.

Fast… you get the work done quickly and efficiently.

Correct… and it’s right the first time, without preventable errors.

Being first takes guts. Being fast takes training. And being correct takes care.

All three at once is rare. Two would be great. And just one (any one) is required if you want to be a professional.

Alas, too often, in our confusion about priorities and our fear of shipping, we end up doing none and settling for average instead.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

On one foot

Smartphones can hobble us. They connect us, and do it with persistence, drip by drip. But they also push us to make everything fit on a very small screen for a very short time.

Teaching complicated ideas to people on a phone is like trying to teach geography to a bunch of sugared-up kids who just had a triple espresso, while they are standing on one foot being bitten by a swarm of mosquitos.

There could be a direct correlation between smart phone usage and underinformed mass behavior.

Sometimes it’s worth opening up a laptop and slowing down just a bit.

Yes, opening up a laptop might count as slowing down a bit.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Marketing sauerkraut

The story goes that James Cook brought fermented german cabbage with him on a long voyage, an innovative way to combat scurvy.

He knew that getting his sailors to eat this strange and stinky food was going to be difficult, particularly since scurvy is a long-term problem, not something you want to try to solve after you get it.

His answer was based on recognizing the power of status roles and is widely applicable:

For the first two weeks of the journey, only the captain and the officers were allowed to eat sauerkraut.

Demand creation through status roles has a long history, apparently.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Learning from the factory/dealer divide

Car factories are a bit of a miracle. They make a complex, expensive device, and they do it close to perfectly. People love their cars, and regularly buy new ones long before they need to. It’s a largely solved engineering problem.

On the other hand, car dealerships are a disaster. No one likes them. They’re scammy, stressful and unpredictable.

The difference comes down to management vs. leadership.

Car factories are measured and managed. For a hundred years, stopwatches and spreadsheets have turned the process of making a car into a predictable, improvable system. Management is an act of authority and compliance, and in the controlled setting of a factory, it works.

Car dealers might try to measure the easy metrics of output (how many sold) but they’ve consistently failed at managing the improvised human interactions that car salespeople engage in. It turns out that the few great car dealers are great because of leadership, not management. Leadership is engaged with voluntarily, an enrolled engagement around meaning and manners, not process and motion.

Most of us don’t work in a factory. Most of us aren’t trying to solve an engineering problem. On our best days, we are leaders, or we are led by humans worthy of our best selves.

Leadership is difficult work, as far from a solvable engineering problem as we’ll encounter. It’s easier, though, if we realize that that’s what we’re doing.

When you run your dealership like a factory, you’re not going to succeed, nor are you going to please your staff. This is what creates senseless and humanity-starved bureaucracies.

The alternative:

Hire the right people, walk away from those that aren’t on the journey.

Gain enrollment.

Model behaviors.

Celebrate the right contributions.

Develop a culture, a language, a way of being on the path.

Commit to the journey.

People like us do things like this.

Raise the standards, repeat the process.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

How far behind?

Should you give up?

There are people who have read far more books than you have, and you will certainly never catch up.

Your website began with lousy traffic stats, in fact, they all do. Should you even bother?

The course you’re in–you’re a few lessons behind the leaders. Time to call it quits?

Quitting merely because you’re behind is a trap, a form of hiding that feels safe, but isn’t. The math is simple: whatever you switch to because you quit is another place you’re going to be behind as well.

It’s not a race, it’s a journey. And the team that scores first doesn’t always win.

Reblogged from: here