Uncategorized

Skills vs planning

If you’re a gardener, planting orange trees in Ottawa, and nothing’s growing, it’s possible to beat yourself up, burn yourself out and say, “I’m a bad gardener.”

Or,

You could realize that oranges aren’t easy to grow in Ottawa. You could either move to Cuba or plant winter wheat instead.

But don’t beat yourself up just because the climate doesn’t match your seeds.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Processing the undeserved

If someone offers you a compliment by mistake, or gives you the benefit of the doubt, or lets you into traffic… my hunch is that you accept. You might not totally deserve it, but hey, they might see something in you that’s worthy.

On the other hand, when we’re unfairly blamed, harshly judged or cut off, well, that’s completely unacceptable. That’s enough to ruin a whole day. That’s reason for revenge or at the very least, the blowing off of steam.

Does that feel imbalanced?

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The musclebound baby

That’s pretty unlikely.

When we see someone with well developed abs, we don’t say, “oh sure, he was born that way.” Instead, we realize that a lot of effort went into it.

The same thing ought to be true for people who understand science, or make good decisions, or are capable of emotional labor. You don’t get to let yourself off the hook by pointing out that it doesn’t come easy to you. That’s beside the point.

We’re all capable of huge leaps of insight and empathy if we’re willing to go to work to learn how.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Do what you’re good at, or…

get really good at what you do.

You have nearly unlimited strategic choices and options about your career and what your organization does.

Which means you can focus on doing things you are truly good at.

Or, if a particular task, project or career is important to you, you can do the hard work to get good at it.

But it makes no sense at all to grumble and do something poorly. To insist that the competition is playing unfairly. To try to persuade your market that their standards make no sense…

The market is selfish. It doesn’t care a whit about how hard you’re working or how difficult the task is. If someone else is consistently telling a better story (and delivering on it), the market will find them.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

One way to think about talent

If you’ve worked hard for it, it’s a skill.

If it’s something that other people have that you believe you can’t possibly achieve, it’s a talent.

Of course, they think the same thing about your skill, don’t they?

Being jealous of talents that are actually skills is a great way to let yourself off the hook and make yourself miserable at the same time.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Overdraft protection

The problem with taking all we can get away with is that we fail to invest in a cushion, in goodwill, in a reserve for when things don’t go the way we expect.

Short-term thinking pays no attention to the possible need for trust. It pushes us to take what we can right now, without regard for tomorrow.

The magic of overdraft protection is that it almost always costs less in advance than we’d be willing to pay later.

What goes around..

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Skills vs. talents

If you can learn it, it’s a skill.

If it’s important, but innate, it’s a talent.

The thing is, almost everything that matters is a skill. If even one person is able to learn it, if even one person is able to use effort and training to get good at something, it’s a skill.

It’s entirely possible that some skills are easier for talented people to learn. It’s entirely possible you don’t want to expend the energy and dedicate the effort to learn that next skill.

But realizing that it’s a skill is incredibly empowering and opens the door of possibility.

What are you going to learn next?

Reblogged from: here