Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

“But that’s not what I meant”

There’s no more urgent reason to write.

It keeps you from insisting that people read your mind, understand your gestures and generally guess what you want.

If you can learn to share what you hope to communicate, written in a way that even a stranger can understand, you’ll not only improve your communication, you’ll learn to think more clearly as well.

The person who most benefits from your writing might be you.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

How cold is the turkey?

If your customers had to stop using your product or service tomorrow, how much would they miss it?

How easy are you to replace?

How deep are the habits, how essential are the interactions?

Being missed when you’re gone is a worthy objective.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Four ways to improve customer service

Delegate it to your customers. Let them give feedback, good and bad, early and often.
Delegate it to your managers. Build in close monitoring, training and feedback. Have them walk the floor, co-creating with their teams.
Use technology. Monitor digital footprints, sales per square foot, visible customer actions.
Create a culture where peers inspire peers, in which each employee acts like a leader, pushing the culture forward. People like us do things like this. People like us, care.
You’ve probably guessed that the most valuable one, the fourth, is also far and away the most difficult to create. Culture is a posture that lasts. It’s corroded by shortcuts and by inattention, and fed by constant investment and care.

Big company or small, it doesn’t matter. There are government agencies and tiny non-profits that have a culture of care and service. And then there are the rest…

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Just a little more

It’s often about asking, not about what’s needed.

Years ago, when I lived in California, I’d go to the grocery store nearly every day. I usually paid by check. Each time, the clerk would ask me for my phone number and then write it on the check.

When I ran out of checks, I decided to be clever and had my phone number printed on them. You guessed it, without missing a beat, that same clerk started asking me for my driver’s license number (and yes, I did it one more time, and we moved on to my social security number).

The information wasn’t the point. It was the asking, the time taken to look closely at the document.

It’s tempting to listen to our customers (“why aren’t there warm nuts in first class?”) and then add the features they request. But often, you’ll find that these very same customers are asking for something else. Maybe they don’t actually want a discount, just the knowledge that they tried to get one.

What’s really happening here is that people are seeking the edges, trying to find something that gets a reaction, a point of failure, proof that your patience, your largesse or your menu isn’t infinite. Get patient with your toddler, and you might discover your toddler starts to seek a new way to get your attention. Give that investigating committee what they’re asking, and they’ll ask for something else.

They’re not looking for one more thing, they’re looking for a ‘no’, for acknowledgment that they reached the edge. That’s precisely what they’re seeking, and you’re quite able to offer them that edge of finiteness.

Sometimes, “no, I’m sorry, we can’t do that,” is a feature.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Cost reduce or value increase?

Organizations that want to increase their metrics either invest in:

Creating more value for their customers, or

Doing just enough to keep going, but for less effort and money.

During their first decade, the core group at Amazon regularly amazed customers by investing in work that created more value. When you do that, people talk, the word spreads, growth happens.

Inevitably, particularly for public companies, it becomes easier to focus on keeping what you’ve got going, but cheaper. You may have noticed, for example, that their once legendary customer service hardly seems the same, with 6 or 7 interactions required to get an accurate and useful response.

This happens to organizations regardless of size or stature. It’s a form of entropy. Unless you’re vigilant, the apparently easy path of cost reduction will distract you from the important work of value creation.

The key question to ask in the meeting is: Are we increasing value or lowering costs?

Race to the top or race to the bottom, it’s a choice.

Reblogged from: here