Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Price and satisfaction

You don’t need to read many reviews to realize that the correlation between price and satisfaction isn’t what you might have guessed.

It’s super rare for someone to write, “5 stars. The product wasn’t perfect, it wasn’t exactly what I needed, but it was really cheap, so, good job!”

In fact, things that are free (streaming music or movies, blog posts, speeches, etc.) almost never get bonus happiness because they had the lowest possible price.

And almost as rare is the review that says, “This is terrific, it was magical and solved all my problems, but I’m only giving it three stars because it had a high price.”

If you want to create satisfaction, the two elements are:

Make useful promises

Keep them

Price is unrelated, except for one thing: Charge enough that you can afford to actually keep your promise. The thrill of a low price disappears quickly, but the pain of a broken promise lasts a very long time.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

“But where’s the money?”

A colleague was talking to the CEO of a fast-growing small business about a partnership opportunity.

The CEO said, “well, this is something we believe in, something we want to have happen,” and then he continued, “in fact, it’s something my partners and I want to be able to support in our personal and our corporate lives.”

But he declined, because, times are tough, the company is small, they need all their resources, etc.

If you aren’t willing to live your values now, when will you start?

A company that begins with its priorities straight–about how it will keep promises, treat its workers, support causes it believes in–will rarely have trouble becoming the kind of company that does this at scale.

But if you put it in a folder marked “later,” it may never happen.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Rejection-seeking as a form of hiding

When you get rejected, you’re off the hook. No promises need to be kept, no vulnerability felt down the road. When you are rejected, you don’t have to show up, to listen or to care.

All you have to do is make promises far bigger than people are prepared to believe about you. Or try to be accepted by people who are in no mood (or have no experience) trusting people like you or promises like this.

Seeking out ways to get rejected is a sport unto itself. It’s tempting, but it’s not clear that it’s a productive thing to become skilled at.

Far more frightening (and more powerful) to earn a reputation instead of merely asserting one.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Specific promises, kept

We live in a vague world. And it gets vaguer all the time. There are so many waffle words, so many equivocations, so many ways to sort of say what we kind of intend to possibly do…

In this environment, the power of the specific, measurable and useful promise made and kept is difficult to overstate. And if you can do it regularly, on time and without a fuss, we will notice.

[If it’s not working for you, perhaps you need to make and keep bigger promises. “Service excellence is our goal,” doesn’t count.]

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The simple first rule of branding and marketing anything (even yourself)

Not a secret, often overlooked:

“Keep your promises.”

If you say you’ll show up every day at 8 am, do so. Every day.

If you say your service is excellent, make it so.

If circumstances or priorities change, well then, invest to change them back. Or tell the truth, and mean it.

If traffic might be bad, plan for it.

Is there actually unusually heavy call volume? Really?

Want a bigger brand? Make bigger promises. And keep them.