Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The exaggeration of small differences without a difference

“What should we do with all the left-handed people?”

“There are far too many people in this organization who wear glasses. It’s hurting our ability to compete.”

Here’s a simple trick: Every time you consider identifying a group to exclude, overlook or fear, every time you consider naming your football team after an ethnic or cultural group, or wonder about how a group makes you feel…

Substitute a label or perhaps a slur that’s been used against a group you belong to instead.

It sounds ridiculous when you say that out loud, doesn’t it?

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

The professional pushes back

The architect refuses to design the big, ugly building that merely maximizes short term revenue. She understands that raising the average is part of her job.

The surgeon refuses to do needless surgery, no matter how much the client insists. He doesn’t confuse his oath with his income.

The marketer won’t help his client produce a spammy campaign filled with tricks and deceptions, because she knows that her career is the sum of her work.

The statesman won’t rush to embrace the bloodlust of the crowd, because statesmen govern in favor of our best instincts, not our worst ones.

There are plenty of people who will pander, race to the bottom and figure out how to, “give the public what it wants.” But that doesn’t have to be you. Professionals have standards. Professionals push back.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Anxiety loves company

Somehow, at least in our culture, we find relief when others are anxious too.

So we spread our anxiety, stoking it in other people, looking for solace in the fear in their eyes.

And thanks to the media, to the microphone we each have, to our hyper-connected culture, it’s easier than ever to spread our anxiety if we choose. And when someone who seeks power offers to hear our anxiety in exchange for attention or a vote, it gets even worse.

It’s worth noting that there’s no correlation between the real world and anxiety. In fact, it’s probably the opposite–when times are good, people with a lot to lose start to get that itch.

Absorb the anxiety if you wish, spread it if you must, but understand that it’s an invention, and it’s optional.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Rigor

Doing things with rigor takes effort, but not everything you put effort into is done with rigor.

Rigor is a focus on process. Paying attention to not just how you do things, but why. Rigor requires us to never use an emergency as an excuse. It is a process for the long haul, the work of a professional.

An amateur bread baker leaves the kitchen coated in flour, and sometimes, perhaps, ends up with a great loaf of bread.

A professional baker might not seem to be as flustered, as hassled or even as busy. But the bread, the result of this mindful process, is worth buying, every day.

We know that you’re working hard.

The next step is to do it with rigor.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Transitions

Coming and going matter far more than what happens in the middle.

Opening things.

Closing them.

Tearing off the bandage.

Losing something.

Meeting someone new.

Getting on the airplane, getting off of it.

Being greeted.

Elections.

Ending a feud.

We mistakenly spend most of our time thinking about, working on and measuring the in-between parts, imagining that this is the meat of it, the important work. In fact, humans remember the transitions, because it’s moments of change and possibility and trepidation that light us up.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Don’t tug on capes, share them

Shannon Weber decided that there wasn’t enough love, recognition or connection in her world, so she did something about it. When she finds an unsung (don’t say ‘ordinary’ hero) she makes them a cape.

Caping people, catching them doing something right, shining a light on a familiar hero.

It turns out that this is way more difficult than being cynical, or ironic, or bitter. Being closed is a lot easier than being connected. It takes guts.

What kind of impact does one act of kindness make? It can last for years.

Go, cape someone.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Without a doubt

Occasionally, people in power come to the conclusion that doubt is a problem.

They conflate confidence with certainty.

Along the way, things worked out for them. They had a willingness to leap, some lucky breaks and a lot of hard work. So they seduce themselves with the black and white dichotomy of certainty. Because, after all, they were certain and look what happened. It all worked out.

Certainty is a form of hiding. It is a way of drowning out our fear, but it’s also a surefire way to fail to see what’s really happening around us.

If you’re certain, you’re probably not prepared for the unexpected, and sooner or later, you’re going to be badly surprised.

People without doubt aren’t looking hard enough.

Reblogged from: here