Self-Realisation

Most vs. Enough

It’s easy to be confused about the difference.

“Most” as in the best, the fastest, the cheapest.

“Enough” as in good enough. And that means just what it sounds like.

If you run an ambulance company, you need to be the fastest at response. (The “most quick”). Anything else is a reason for potential users to switch.

On the other hand, if you’re delivering flowers, ‘fast enough’ is plenty fast.

Everyone competes on something. That thing you compete on is your most. The other things you do, those need to be enough.

The two mistakes organizations and freelancers make:

They try for ‘most’ at things where ‘enough’ is just fine, and they waste their effort.
They settle for ‘enough’ when the market is looking for the one with the ‘most’.
The only way to maximize your most is to be really clear where your enough is.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

When your marketplace shifts

It might happen to you.

Many markets have a base (people seeking a solution), a middle (people seeking some originality, something new, something a little better) and a top (educated and passionate consumers willing to go extra miles to get something special).

Here’s what happens (imagine travel agents, for example, or the farmers’ markets in France):

A. a disruption happens to the marketplace, instantly sucking the base out of the market. When was the last time you called a travel agent? Or, in the case of France, the hypermarche destroyed the need to wait for the weekly market to get some eggs and some carrots.

B. without a base, merchants have to struggle to attract enough business to stick around and to invest in getting better. Many of these merchants either don’t have the skills, the resources or the good taste to build a business without the base. They slowly, and painfully, disappear.

C. A few flee to the top. These are the folks with great heirloom tomatoes for sale, or the ones who specialize in high-end cruises or adventure travel. But it’s tough going, because without the base and the middle, every sale is on a knife’s edge, every customer realizes how much power she has.

The marketplace disruption puts huge pressure on any merchant who merely created a commodity. This means vineyards, graphic designers, photographers, etc.

When you see it coming, there are only two choices:

Run like hell to a new market, or,

Move up, faster and more boldly than anyone thinks is rational.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Sort by price

Imagine a supermarket (or any store, for that matter), where the items are arranged by price. At one end is the salt and the chewing gum, and at the other end are mops and steaks.

We always think about the cost of an item before we buy it, but we don’t buy it because of what it costs.

If you find yourself acting like you sell a commodity, saying, “this is category X and the price is Y” then you’ve ceased doing any sort of marketing. You’re a commodity provider by choice, which is fine as long as you’re okay with competing in a race to the bottom.

The alternative is to do the difficult and risky work of earning attention, earning a reputation and mostly telling a story that takes your product or service out of the commodity category and into a space defined by connection, meaning and possibility instead.

Low price is the refuge for the marketer who doesn’t have anything more meaningful to offer.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The flip is elusive

For a generation after people realized that smoking would kill them, many smart, informed people still smoked. Then, many of them stopped.

After discovering that an expensive luxury good is made out of the same materials as a cheaper alternative, many people stick with the expensive one. And then they gradually stop going out of their way to pay more.

After a technology breakthrough makes it clear that a new approach is faster, cheaper and more reliable, many people stick with the old way. Until they don’t.

And inevitably, it doesn’t matter how much people discover about their favorite candidate, they seem impervious to revelations, facts and the opinions of others. For a while, sometimes a very long while. But then, they assert that all along they knew something was amiss and find a new person to align with.

Computers don’t work this way. Cats don’t have a relationship like this with hot stoves. Imaginary logical detectives always get the message the first time.

For the rest of us, though, the flip isn’t something that happens at the first glance or encounter with new evidence.

This doesn’t mean the evidence doesn’t matter.

It means that we’re bad at admitting we were wrong.

Bad at giving up one view of the world to embrace the other.

Mostly, we’re bad at abandoning our peers, our habits and our view of ourselves.

If you want to change people’s minds, you need more than evidence. You need persistence. And empathy. And mostly, you need the resources to keep showing up, peeling off one person after another, surrounding a cultural problem with a cultural solution.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Short order cooks rarely make change happen

How far in the future does your agenda extend?

One way to tell: of the things you worked on last week, how many were due last week?

The marketplace has always tempted us with short-term cycles (they require less trust) and the internet amplifies this temptation to buy fast, sell fast, work fast, measure fast, move on.

But the work that leads to change is rarely written on an order slip or an RFP. Selling to the next buyer is easier than changing the culture, but easier isn’t always the point.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The marketing we deserve

We say we want sustainable packaging…

but end up buying the one in fancy packaging instead.

We say we want handmade, local goods…

but end up buying the cheap one, because it’s ‘just as good.’

We say we want the truth…

but end up buying hype.

We say we want to hire for diversity (of thought, culture and background)…

but end up hiring people who share our point of view in most things.

We say we want to be treated with respect…

but end up buying from manipulative, selfish, short-term profit-seekers instead.

We say we don’t want to be hustled…

but we wait for the last-minute, the going-out-of-business rush or the high pressure push.

It actually starts with us.

Here’s the thing. It also starts with anyone with the leverage and power and authority to make something.

Because even if it’s the marketing we deserve, it’s also the marketing they create.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Show your work

It’s tempting to sit in the corner and then, voila, to amaze us all with your perfect answer.

But of course, that’s not what ever works.

What works is evolving in public, with the team. Showing your work. Thinking out loud. Failing on the way to succeeding, imperfecting on your way to better than good enough.

Do people want to be stuck with the first version of the iPhone, the Ford, the Chanel dress? Do they want to read the first draft of that novel, see the rough cut of that film? Of course not.

Ship before you’re ready, because you will never be ready. Ready implies you know it’s going to work, and you can’t know that. You should ship when you’re prepared, when it’s time to show your work, but not a minute later.

The purpose isn’t to please the critics. The purpose is to make your work better.

Polish with your peers, your true fans, the market. Because when we polish together, we make better work.

Reblogged from: here