Self-Realisation

The pre-mortem

If you want us to take your new proposal seriously, consider including a pre mortem.

Include a detailed analysis of why your project might fail.

Specific weak spots, individuals who need to come on board, assumptions that might not be true…

If you’ve got a track record of successfully predicting specific points of failure before they happen, we’re a lot more likely to trust your judgment next time.

Reblogged from: here

Advertisements
Self-Realisation

The saying/doing gap

At first, it seems as though the things you declare, espouse and promise matter a lot. And they do. For a while.

But in the end, we will judge you on what you do. When the gap between what you say and what you do gets big enough, people stop listening.

The compromises we make, the clients we take on, the things we do when we think no one is watching… this is how people measure us.

It seems as though the amount of time it takes for the gap to catch up with marketers/leaders/humans is getting shorter and shorter.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

on saying “No”

If you’re not proud of it, don’t serve it.

If you can’t do a good job, don’t take it on.

If it’s going to distract you from the work that truly matters, pass.

If you don’t know why they want you to do this, ask.

If you need to hide it from your mom, reconsider.

If it benefits you but not the people you care about, decline.

If you’re going along with the crowd, that’s not enough.

If it creates a habit that costs you in the long run, don’t start.

If it doesn’t move you forward, hesitate then walk away.

The short run always seems urgent, and a moment where compromise feels appropriate. But in the long run, it’s the good ‘no’s that we remember.

On the other hand, there’s an imperative to say “yes.” Say yes and build something that matters.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

It’s not a problem if you prepare for it

Buffalo famously gets a lot of snow. Growing up there, though, no one really freaked out about it, because we had machines to get rid of it and the attitude that it was hardly a problem worth hyperventilating over.

Most problems are like that. When we prepare for them and get used to them, they’re not problems anymore. They’re merely the way it is.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

All cases are special cases

The art of the successful institution is figuring out which cases are special enough to deserve a fresh eye.

It’s virtually impossible to scale an institution that insists on making a new decision every time it encounters a new individual. On the other hand, what makes a bureaucracy stupid is its insistence that there are no special cases.

They’re all special. The difficult work at scale is figuring out which ones are special enough.

And, if you want to be seen and respected and sought out as the anti-bureaucracy, there’s your strategy: All cases are special cases.

Good judgment, it turns out, is very difficult to boil down to a few pages in a rulebook.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The paradox of expectations

Low expectations are often a self-fulfilling prophecy. We insulate ourselves from failure, don’t try as hard, brace for the worst and often get it.

High expectations, on the other hand, will inevitably lead to disappointment. Keep raising what you expect and sooner or later (probably sooner) it’s not going to happen. And we know that a good outcome that’s less than the great one we hoped for actually feels like failure.

Perhaps it’s worth considering no expectations. Intense effort followed by an acceptance of what you get in return. It doesn’t make good TV, but it’s a discipline that can turn you into a professional.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Two kinds of busy

When I’m giving a speech, I don’t have the ability to squeeze in a phone call, think about what’s for dinner or plan tomorrow’s meeting. I’m doing one thing, and it’s taking everything I’ve got. So yes, I’m busy, all in.

On the other hand, we all are familiar with the other kind of busy, the busy of feeding one kid while listening to see if the other is still napping, while emptying the groceries, checking email and generally keeping the world on its axis.

I have two suggestions:

a. if you’re used to being one kind of busy, try the other one out for a change. You might find it suits you.

and

b. if what you’re doing isn’t working, if you’re not excelling at what you set out to do or not getting the results you seek, it might be because you’re confused about what sort of busy is going to get you there…

Reblogged from: here