Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Entrepreneurship is not a job

You don’t apply. You don’t get a salary. No one picks you.

Bragging about how much money you’ve raised or what your valuation is a form of job thinking.

Entrepreneurship is a chance to trade a solution to someone who has a problem that needs solving.

Solve more problems, solve bigger problems, solve problems more widely and you’re an entrepreneur.

It’s tempting to industrialize this work, to make it something with rules and bosses and processes. But that’s not the heart of it.

The work is to solve problems in a way that you’re proud of.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

“Is judgment involved?”

No judgment, no responsibility.

No responsibility, no risk.

There’s a fork in the road. If you seek out roles without responsibility, you might just find a sinecure.

This is the hot job for undifferentiated job seekers at the placement office, the job where a famous company will tell you what to do all day.

Alas, those are the jobs that will be deleted first. The jobs that come with little in the way of respect or stability. These are the jobs that big companies automate whenever they can, or create enough rules to avoid any variation if they can’t.

The other choice is a job loaded with judgment calls. One where it’s extremely likely you’ll make a decision you regret, and get blamed for it. One where you take responsibility instead of waiting for authority.

It turns out that those are the best jobs of all.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

“So busy doing my job, I can’t get any work done”

Your job is an historical artifact. It’s a list of tasks, procedures, alliances, responsibilities, to-dos, meetings (mostly meetings) that were layered in, one at a time, day after day, for years.

And your job is a great place to hide.

Because, after all, if you’re doing your job, how can you fail? Get in trouble? Make a giant error?

The work, on the other hand, is the thing you do that creates value. This value you create, the thing you do like no one else can do, is the real reason we need you to be here, with us.

When you discover that the job is in the way of the work, consider changing your job enough that you can go back to creating value.

Anything less is hiding.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Can we talk about process first?

It’s so tempting to get straight to the issue, especially since you’re certain that you’re right.

The challenge is that organizations and relationships that thrive are built to go beyond this one discussion. They are built for the long haul, and this particular issue, while important, isn’t as vital as our ability to work together on the next hundred issues.

So yes, you’re probably right, and yes, it’s urgent, but if we can’t agree on a process to talk about this, we’re not going to get anywhere, not for long.

If the process we’ve used in the past is broken, let’s fix it, because, in fact, getting that process right is actually more urgent than the problem we’ve got right now. Our meta-conversation pays significant dividends. At the very least, it gets us working together on the same side of a problem before we have to be on opposite sides of the issue of the day.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

The narcissism of minor differences

Really?

You’re arguing about that trivial difference between us?

Substantive disagreement is rarely the issue that splits tribes, destroys thriving groups or wastes time at meetings. Instead, it’s our desire to carve out a little space for ourselves in a group that seems to agree on almost everything.

The work is too important to sidetrack about the things we disagree on.

Point out this narcissism when you see it and move on to the important stuff, to amplifying the things we agree on.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

But what if this was your only job?

Okay, I know you have competing priorities and that your organisation has grown and that maybe this isn’t the most important thing on your agenda any more…

The thing is, your competition might actually act like the thing that they’re doing is their only job. They might believe that in fact, treating this customer as if she’s the only person in the world is worth it. That fixing that squeaky door, addressing that two-year old bug in the software, or taking one extra moment to look someone in the eye and talking to her with respect is worth it.

We don’t become mediocre all at once, and we rarely do it on purpose. Instead, we start believing that the entire project is our job, not this one thing, this one thing we used to do so brilliantly.

The day the organization installs the, “your call is very important to us…” message is the day that they announce to themselves who they are becoming. Customers rarely care about your priorities.

Getting bigger is supposed to make us more effective and efficient. Alas, the way to get there isn’t by doing what you used to do, but less well.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The people who started Staples didn’t do it…

because they love office supplies.

They did it because they love organizing and running profitable retail businesses. They love hiring and leasing and telling a story that converts prospects into customers. Postits are sort of irrelevant.

You shouldn’t become a middle school math teacher because you love math. You should do it because you love teaching.

I hope Staples has a senior buyer who actually does love office supplies. I hope that textbooks get written by people who love, really love, the topic they’re writing about. It’s easy, though, to fool ourselves into believing that going up the ladder means we get to do more of the thing we started out doing.

It’s often the case that the people we surround ourselves with (and the tasks we do) have far more to do with job satisfaction and performance than the subject of our work.

Reblogged from: here