Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

A job without a boss

That’s what many freelancers want.

The ability to do your work, but without the hassle of someone telling you what to do.

The thing is, finding a well-paying job without a boss used to be a lot easier than it is now. The race to the bottom is fierce, and the only way to avoid it is to create projects, innovate on strategy and build something worth seeking out.

In other words, you need a better boss.

Reblogged from: here

Advertisements
Self-Realisation

It’s never enough

It’s not enough.

There are more people, better off, with more freedom, more agency and more power than at any other time in our history.

That’s not enough.

As we use technology and culture to create more health, more access and more dignity for more people, we keep reminding ourselves how inadequate it is in the face of the injustice and pain that remains.

That’s how we get better.

We must focus on the less fortunate and the oppressed not because the world isn’t getting better but because it is.

It’s our attention to those on the fringes that causes the world to get better.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Plenty of room on the island

Have you noticed that authors often happily recommend books by other authors (even though an MBA might call them competitors)?

Not only that, but books sell best in the bookstore, right next to the other books.

It would be a stunning surprise if Tim Cook wrote a blurb for a Samsung phone. They live in a zero-sum universe, assuming that everyone is likely to only buy one or the other.

But for the rest of us, in most industries, it turns out that the real competition is inaction. Few markets have expanded to include everyone, and most of those markets (like books and music) have offerings where people buy more than one.

This means that if there’s more good stuff, more people enter the market, the culture gets better, more good work is produced and enjoyed, more people enter the market, and on and on.

So encouraging and promoting the work of your fellow artists, writers, tweeters, designers, singers, painters, speakers, instigators and leaders isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s smart as well.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The simple way to get better at business writing

Don’t do business writing.

Have you ever met someone in industry who talks like he writes? You visit a store and the person says, “effective January 1, 2015, we have ceased operations at this location. For further information, correspondence should be addressed to our headquarters.” Of course not. That would be awkward.

Write like you talk instead.

“We closed this store last year. Sorry for the hassle, please call us if you have any questions.”

With effort and practice, it’s possible to speak with respect, precision and energy. After you speak that way, write down what you said.

That’s effective business writing.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Time doesn’t exist until we invent it

The transcontinental railroads led to the invention of time zones. For the first time, everyone needed to be in sync, regardless of what village one lived in.

A few generations later, we’re in all in sync, to the second, thanks to the computers in our pockets.

Time is borrowed, wasted, spent. We find the time, slow down time, take our time. Its Miller, quitting, clobberin time. We focus on the stitch in time, hard time, closing time, not to mention big, daylight savings, race against, first, last, due, nick of…

Time is so variable, so based on our experience, that the absolute measure of time is almost meaningless. Don’t even get me started about relativity and time travel.

Time on a long bus trip goes so much slower than time spent doing what we love with people we care about. We’ll pay $1000 to buy an hour in some circumstances, but refuse to pay a $5 premium to save an hour in others.

Time doesn’t exist, not in a way that matters to most people. The story we tell ourselves about time, though, is the overriding narrative of our day to day lives.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The sophisticates

Every profession creates them. Doctors and lawyers, sure, but also speakers and programmers and rodeo riders.

The sophisticate is on one side of the chasm, and the hack, the amateur, the self-defeating noob is on the other.

The sophisticate knows how to walk and talk and prepare, but mostly, to engage with us in a way that amplifies her professionalism. We spend months at business school or med school or at boot camp teaching people to be part of that tribe, to establish that they are, in fact, insiders.

The people at the fringe booths at a trade show, the ones who get rejected from every job they apply to without even being interviewed, the ones who don’t earn our trust or our attention–this isn’t necessarily because they aren’t talented, it’s merely because they haven’t invested the time or found the guts to cross the chasm to the side of people who are the real deal.

It’s fun to make a fish-out-of-water TV show about the outsider who’s actually really good at his craft. But in real life, fish out of water don’t do very well.

Yes, acting like you are a professional might be even more important than actually being good at what you do. When given the option, do both.

Reblogged from: here