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Work before passion

“Offer me something I’m passionate about and I’ll show up with all of my energy, effort and care.”

That’s a great way to hide.

Because nothing is good enough to earn your passion before you do it. Perhaps, in concept, it’s worthy, but as soon as you closely examine the details and the pitfalls, it’s easy to decide it’s better to wait for a better offer.

What about considering the opposite?

“Offer me a chance to contribute, and I’ll work hard on it, with focus, and once I begin to make progress, I’ll become passionate about it.”

Work before passion measures our craft in terms of contribution, not in an idealized model of perfection.

Passion comes from feeling needed, from approaching mastery, from doing work that matters.

Reblogged from: here

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Mind the gap(s)

There are two kinds of marketing, and the gap between them keeps widening. You’ll need to choose.

Do marketing to people or with them…

Actually, there are a few other gaps worth considering:

Average stuff vs remarkable edge cases

Brand vs. direct

Unmeasured vs. measured

Largest imaginable market vs. smallest viable audience.

And… Attention as a precious resource vs. something to be purchased or stolen, cheap churn, and then move on.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

On feeling incompetent

At some point, grown ups get tired of the feeling that accompanies growth and learning.

We start calling that feeling, “incompetence.”

We’re not good at the new software, we resist a brainstorming session for a new way to solve a problem, we never did bother to learn to juggle…

Not because we don’t want the outcomes, but because the journey promises to be difficult. Difficult in the sense that we’ll feel incompetent.

Which accompanies all growth.

First we realize something can be done.

Then we realize we can’t do it.

And finally, we get better at it.

It’s the second step that messes with us.

If you care enough to make a difference, if you care enough to get better–you should care enough to experience incompetence again.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Loud voices vs. important ones

Broken systems get worse when we confuse the loud voices with the important ones.

Spend a lot of time listening to the loudest complaints and you will elevate those voices to importance, because you’re no longer carefully listening to the more easily overlooked constituents.

A persistent typist with a keyboard might be a cranky critic, but is this the person you set out to serve?

If an airline makes 84% of its profit on leisure travelers, it’s not clear that the person who flies once a year on a last-minute first class fare is the person they ought to be paying the most attention to.

We can acknowledge that someone is upset, we can see them, respect them and help them. But we shouldn’t get confused that there’s a correlation between their ALL CAPS EFFORT AT ATTENTION and our agenda to serve the people we seek to serve.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Two ways to solve a problem and provide a service

With drama. Make sure the customer knows just how hard you’re working, what extent you’re going to in order to serve. Make a big deal out of the special order, the additional cost, the sweat and the tears.

Without drama. Make it look effortless.

Either can work. Depends on the customer and the situation.

But it’s a choice. We can make it with intention.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Your Bob Dylan story

I know dozens of people who have a story about meeting, or nearly meeting, or somehow engaging with Bob Dylan.

And just about everyone they know has questions about him, about those encounters, about what it was like.

My guess is that these stories began to spring up long before he was a Nobel Prize winning legend.

The question, then: Who has a story about you?

Reblogged from: here