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The big hill

There’s a commuter shortcut near my house.

To make it work, you need to accelerate the SUV up a really big hill, breaking the speed limit by ten or twenty mph. Then roll a stop sign, avoid a few kids walking to school and gun it on the downhill.

All to save three minutes.

Meanwhile, the other commuters arrive at work with their psychic energy saved for the real work. The hard work of confronting the status quo.

The first shortcut is selfish. It wastes resources and engages in risk to help no one but the driver.

The other work, though, is priceless. Those are the hills worth taking.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Yes, there’s a free lunch

In a physical economy in which scarcity is the fundamental driver, eating lunch means someone else gets less.

But in a society where ideas lead to trust and connection and productivity, where working together is better than working apart, where exchange creates value for both sides…

Then the efficient sharing of ideas is its own free lunch.

All of us are smarter than any of us, so the value to all goes up when you share.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

The beat goes on

That’s what makes it the beat.

There are other things that stop. That start. That go faster or slower.

But don’t worry about the beat. We can’t change the beat. The beat continues.

When we’re watching it, it continues, and when we’re distracted, it continues. Beat by beat, day by day, it continues.

Awareness of our forward motion, of the tick and tock as we move from yesterday to tomorrow… it gives us perspective and patience if we let it. Or it can stress us out. Up to us.

Look, there goes another one.

What will you do with the next one?

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

How many hops?

Some things, like your next job, might happen as the direct result of one meeting. Here I am, here’s my resume, okay, you’re hired.

But most of the time, that’s not the way it works.

You meet someone. You do a small project. You write an article. It leads to another meeting. You do a slightly bigger project for someone else. You make a short film. That leads to a speaking gig. Which leads to an consulting contract. And then you get the gig.

How many hops does the ball take before it lands where you’re hoping it will?

If you’re walking around with a quid pro quo mindset, giving only enough to get what you need right now, and walking away from anyone or anything that isn’t the destination—not only are you eliminating all the possible multi-hop options, you’re probably not having as much as fun or contributing as much as you could either.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Friction and traction

It’s fashionable for designers and marketers to want to reduce friction in the way they engage with users.

And sometimes, that’s smart. If someone knows what they want, get out of their way and help them get it. One-click, done.

But often, what we want is traction. The traction to find our footing, shift our posture, make a new decision. The traction to actually influence what happens next, not merely slip our way toward a goal of someone else’s choosing.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The two vocabularies (because there are two audiences)

Early adopters want to buy a different experience than people who identify as the mass market do.

Innovators want something fresh, exciting, new and interesting.

The mass market doesn’t. They want something that works.

It’s worth noting here that you’re only an early adopter sometimes, when you want to be. And you’re only in the mass market by choice as well. It’s an attitude.

The people bringing new ideas to the public are early adopters themselves (because it’s often more thrilling than working in a field that does what it did yesterday), and often default to using words that appeal to people like themselves, as opposed to the group in question.

More rarely, there are a few people with a mass market mindset that are charged with launching something for the early adopters, and they make the opposite mistake, dressing up their innovation as something that’s supposed to feel safe.

When you bring a product or service or innovation to people who like to go first, consider words/images like:

New
Innovative
Pioneer
First
Now
Limited
Breakthrough
Controversial
Technology
Brave
Few
Hot
Untested
Slice/Dominate/Win
Private
Dangerous
Change
Secret
On the other hand, people who aren’t seeking disruption are more likely to respond to:

Tested
Established
Proven
Industry-leading
Secure
Widespread
Accepted
Easy
Discounted
Everyone
Experienced
Certified
Highest-rated
Efficient
Simple
Guaranteed
Accredited
Public
Of course, it’s important that these words be true, that your product, your service and its place in the world match the story you’re telling about it.

Once you see this distinction, it seems so obvious, yet our desire to speak to everyone gets in the way of our words.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

“But that’s not what I meant”

There’s no more urgent reason to write.

It keeps you from insisting that people read your mind, understand your gestures and generally guess what you want.

If you can learn to share what you hope to communicate, written in a way that even a stranger can understand, you’ll not only improve your communication, you’ll learn to think more clearly as well.

The person who most benefits from your writing might be you.

Reblogged from: here