Self-Realisation

Say one thing at a time

I know, you might not get the microphone back for a while.

And I know, you want to make sure everyone understands precisely what went into your thinking. Not to mention your desire to make sure that everyone who hears you hears something that they’d like to hear.

But if you try to say three things, we will hear nothing. Because most of the time, we’re hardly listening.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

The right effort of Generosity

Don’t expect much from a drowning man. He’s not going to offer you a candy bar or ask how your day was.

He’s too busy not drowning.

Generosity takes effort.

It requires the space to take your mind off your own problems long enough to see someone else’s.

It requires the confidence to share when a big part of you wants to hoard.

And it requires the emotional labor of empathy.

Generosity begins by trusting ourselves enough to know that we’re not actually drowning.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Prep, spec, fit and finish

In some settings, more than 90% of the time and effort invested isn’t in the actual ‘work’, but in getting setting up, debugging and then polishing the work. Heart surgery, for example, might take five hours to perform, but the actual procedure might only take thirty minutes.

A piece of code might take a few hours to create, but days or weeks to be specced, reviewed, tested and then ready for the public.

Dinner at a fine restaurant is mostly cleaning, chopping, mise en place and service, not the part we see on the plate itself.

And yet…

We often get confused about which part is important, which is worth our time, which is the point of the exercise. Without a doubt, if the thing we built isn’t of high quality, don’t bother. But it turns out that all the other parts, the parts that we think might be beneath us, it’s those that matter the most.

When in doubt, spend half as much time as you expect on the thing that most people do, and far more time on the spec, on the quality control, on the soft stuff, the stuff that actually matters.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Erosion

The Grand Canyon wasn’t created by an earthquake.

While it’s tempting to imagine that the world changes via sudden shocks, that our culture is shifted by dramatic changes in leadership, that grand gestures make all the difference…

It turns out that our daily practice, the piling up of regular actions, the cultural practices and biases that we each choose—that’s what makes change happen.

False promises and urgent reactions are a trap and a sideshow.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Do what you’re good at, or…

get really good at what you do.

You have nearly unlimited strategic choices and options about your career and what your organization does.

Which means you can focus on doing things you are truly good at.

Or, if a particular task, project or career is important to you, you can do the hard work to get good at it.

But it makes no sense at all to grumble and do something poorly. To insist that the competition is playing unfairly. To try to persuade your market that their standards make no sense…

The market is selfish. It doesn’t care a whit about how hard you’re working or how difficult the task is. If someone else is consistently telling a better story (and delivering on it), the market will find them.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Now is never (but here comes tomorrow)

Everything you’re working on is an investment in tomorrow.

While we can choose to enjoy the process, the end result is always at the end of an arc, always the result of many steps, of earning trust, of building a connection.

If you view any particular day without context, it is almost certain to be a failure. Because now never happens. The results always happen later.

Since later is just around the corner, today, right now, is the perfect time to begin.

Now is the moment we get to plant the seeds for later.

Reblogged from: here