Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Price and satisfaction

You don’t need to read many reviews to realize that the correlation between price and satisfaction isn’t what you might have guessed.

It’s super rare for someone to write, “5 stars. The product wasn’t perfect, it wasn’t exactly what I needed, but it was really cheap, so, good job!”

In fact, things that are free (streaming music or movies, blog posts, speeches, etc.) almost never get bonus happiness because they had the lowest possible price.

And almost as rare is the review that says, “This is terrific, it was magical and solved all my problems, but I’m only giving it three stars because it had a high price.”

If you want to create satisfaction, the two elements are:

Make useful promises

Keep them

Price is unrelated, except for one thing: Charge enough that you can afford to actually keep your promise. The thrill of a low price disappears quickly, but the pain of a broken promise lasts a very long time.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The unfairness (and wisdom) of paint

Repainting your house the same color it already was feels like a waste. It’s a lot of effort merely to keep things as they are.

But if you don’t do it, time and entropy kick in and the house starts to fade.

The same can be said for 1,000 elements of your organization, including your relationships with customers, staff, suppliers and technology. The way you approach your market, the skill you bring to your craft, the culture in your organization—it constantly needs another coat of paint.

Rust never sleeps.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Expecting the unexpected

Are you doing your work for an ordered market? A region where there is stability and rules and predictable outcomes? Some examples: selling to people who have purchased before, entering a market with established competitors, contributing to a media ecosystem that works in mostly predictable ways…

The alternative are blue sky arenas where unpredictability is the rule, not the exception.

Most of us don’t live and work on the frontier, and we plan our lives accordingly.

Life on the frontier brings its own rewards (and risks) but there’s never an advantage in imagining that it’s stable. It’s hard to be surprised if you establish up front that you’re likely to be surprised.

It helps to know the rules of physics in the universe where you are choosing to live.

Reblogged from: here