Self-Realisation

Make something great

Not because it will sell.

Not because it’s on the test.

Not because it’s your job.

Merely because you can.

The alternative (waiting for the world to align in a way that permits you to make something great) is hardly worth pursuing, right?

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

The best way to stand for something

The best way to build a brand that matters, a story that spreads, an impact that we remember, is to understand a simple but painful trade-off:

If you want to stand for something,

You can’t stand for everything.

“Anyone can be our customer and we will get you what you want…” is almost impossible to pull off. So is, “we are the cheapest and the most convenient and the best.”

It didn’t work for Sears, or for Chevrolet or for Radio Shack. It definitely doesn’t work for the local freelancer, eager to do whatever is asked.

Relentlessly trimming what’s on offer, combined with a resolute willingness to say, “no,” are two characteristics of great brands. And linchpins, too.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Pushiness

Deliberate, focused, generous, confident, thoughtful, these are all good things. Being pushy isn’t.

Imagine you had a check for $100,000 made out to someone else. Someone you don’t know but can reach out to. How hard would it be for you to cajole this person to take the check from you and cash it?

We call someone pushy when they are trying harder for forward motion than we are. We call them pushy when they have more at stake, or more to gain, than we think we do.

It’s easy to rationalize your pushiness, imagining that the other person really wants to do this project. And it’s just as easy to minimize the value you add, hiding in a corner instead of bringing your value forward.

Pushiness is in the eye of the beholder. Generosity requires that we be aware of how the other person is feeling about the forward motion we’re trying to make.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The other kind of power move

In the common vernacular, a power move is something that gets done to you.

The person with power demands an accommodation, or switches the venue, or has an admin call you instead of calling you himself. Someone with a resource who makes you jump a little higher before he shares it…

Little diva-like gestures to reinforce who has the upper hand.

But what about moves that are based on connection, or generosity, or kindness?

Those take real power.

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Self-Realisation

Rigor

Doing things with rigor takes effort, but not everything you put effort into is done with rigor.

Rigor is a focus on process. Paying attention to not just how you do things, but why. Rigor requires us to never use an emergency as an excuse. It is a process for the long haul, the work of a professional.

An amateur bread baker leaves the kitchen coated in flour, and sometimes, perhaps, ends up with a great loaf of bread.

A professional baker might not seem to be as flustered, as hassled or even as busy. But the bread, the result of this mindful process, is worth buying, every day.

We know that you’re working hard.

The next step is to do it with rigor.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Fear is easy, hope is real

Fear shows up unbidden, it almost never goes away if you will it to, and it’s rarely a useful tool for your best work.

Hope, on the other hand, can be conjured. It arrives when we ask it to, it’s something we can give away to others again and again, and we can use it as fuel to build something bigger than ourselves.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

All my best posts are the posts I haven’t written

Sometimes I’ll get a great idea for a post while out walking or showering or generally not in front of a keyboard. Not just great ideas, but fabulous ones.

And then, after rehearsing the keywords over and over so I don’t forget before I write it down, I forget.

And that post, the post I didn’t write, the post that never saw the light of day–that’s the best post ever.

I think most dreams work this way.

The thing is, an unwritten post is no post at all. It’s merely a little bit of gossamer on wings of hope. Doesn’t count.

The only good posts are the ones I’ve written.

I think most dreams work this way, too.

Reblogged from: here