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Media out of balance

Successful media (let’s define ‘successful’ as media that can make a difference, make a connection and possibly make a living) has four elements:

Attention

Enrollment

Trust and

Permission

Too often, particularly online, people just worry about the first one.

It’s a race to go viral, to go low, to make a bunch of noise. The quick hit, the shortcut, the inflammation.

But attention is insufficient.

Enrollment means that your audience wants to go where you’re going.

Trust earns you the benefit of the doubt.

And permission means you don’t have to begin from scratch every time. You’ve earned some attention. The privilege of delivering anticipated, personal and relevant messages over time.

Reblogged from: here

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How are you organized?

Any organization of more than two people has a structure, intentional or not.

It might be a hub and spoke,

a ladder,

a pyramid,

a lattice,

a hive,

a circle…

Each has an advantage. But the structure of your organization, your systems, your communication–when you work against it, nothing much happens.

Reblogged from: here

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Ringing vs wringing

Ringing is resonant. A small force causes sympathetic vibrations, and magic happens.

Wringing requires significant effort and can even destroy the object it is applied to.

When you ring a bell for your clients, you’ve delivered with care and empathy.

But when you seek to wring every dollar out of a transaction, you’ve probably engaged for the last time.

Reblogged from: here

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The trick question

Useful modern education is not the work of rote. When you tell someone the answer and then give them a test to see if they remember what you told them, that’s not education, it’s incented memorization.

On the other hand, if you can ask someone a question that causes them to think about something unexamined, that challenges them to explore new ways of seeing the world or making connections, you’ve actually caused a change to happen.

The second time you ask them that question, it won’t work as well. Now it’s just rote. That’s why people call it a trick question. Because they learned something. They learned the trick.

We need more trick questions.

Reblogged from: here

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Sprints

How fast can you go?

This is different from the question we ask ourselves most days at work. Careers are often seen as marathons, designed to last as long as we do.

Sprinting—for an hour, a week or a month—develops a different perspective. It helps us understand our upper limit, establishing a performance setting that reminds us of what’s possible.

Not sprinting randomly, erratically, after shiny objects. Sprinting with intent, in a particular direction…

No one can sprint all the time. By its nature, that’s not sprinting. But sprinting now and then is a useful way to learn that we can make an even bigger difference.

Reblogged from: here