Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Better than it needs to be

Why not?

Why not make it more generous, more fair, more insightful than it needs to be? Why not deliver the service with more flair, more care and more urgency?

Why not do it because you can, not because you have to…

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

Training customers

If you frequently run last-minute sales, don’t be surprised if your customers stop buying things in advance. You’re training them to wait.

If you announce things six or seven times, getting louder each time, don’t be surprised if your customers ignore the first few announcements. You’ve trained them to expect you’ll yell if it’s important.

If you don’t offer someone a raise until they find a new job and quit, don’t be surprised if your employees start looking for new jobs.

The way you engage with your customers (students/bosses/peers) trains them on what to expect from interactions with you.

Drip, drip, drip.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Worth reconsidering ?

The status quo is powerful indeed. We add layers, patches and small improvisations, all to shore up something we don’t want to reconsider.

If we had a clean sheet of paper, and could design something that actually worked, what would we do about:

Big-time college sports
School taxes based on location, and school spending based on income
Development costs, transparency and patents related to pharmaceuticals
The Electoral College and gerrymandering
Allocation of electromagnetic spectrum
Stagnant oligopolies
What’s taxed and what’s not
School curriculum
Online identity
Infrastructure priorities
The free market doesn’t always do things as well as an enlightened institution can. And institutions often need our help to become more enlightened.

Sometimes, we need to take a deep breath and decide to do it again, better.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Creating discomfort

If you’re seeking to create positive change in your community, it’s almost certain you’ll be creating discomfort as well.

Want to upgrade the local playground? It sounds like it will be universally embraced by parents and everyone who cares about kids. Except that you now bring up issues of money, of how much is enough, of safety. Change is uncomfortable.

It’s way easier to talk about today’s weather, or what you had for lunch.

Usually, when we’re ready to launch something, we say, “this is going to help people, this is well crafted, I’m proud of it.”

What’s a lot more difficult (but useful) is to say all of that plus, “and this is going to make (some) people uncomfortable.”

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Four ways to improve customer service

Delegate it to your customers. Let them give feedback, good and bad, early and often.
Delegate it to your managers. Build in close monitoring, training and feedback. Have them walk the floor, co-creating with their teams.
Use technology. Monitor digital footprints, sales per square foot, visible customer actions.
Create a culture where peers inspire peers, in which each employee acts like a leader, pushing the culture forward. People like us do things like this. People like us, care.
You’ve probably guessed that the most valuable one, the fourth, is also far and away the most difficult to create. Culture is a posture that lasts. It’s corroded by shortcuts and by inattention, and fed by constant investment and care.

Big company or small, it doesn’t matter. There are government agencies and tiny non-profits that have a culture of care and service. And then there are the rest…

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Two Confusions

Those things you’re bad at? You’re not nearly as bad at them as you fear.

And those things you’re great at? Probably not nearly as good as you hope.

We beat ourselves up a lot, but often focus on the wrong areas, avoiding the soft spots and doubling down on the places where we are well armored.

Mirrors are a fairly new invention. For millennia, we had little idea what we looked like. And only in the last two generations have people had any clue about what they sounded like. Today, even though we’re surrounded by sound, video and light reflecting on us, not to mention comments and the social media maelstrom, we’re still quite bad at self-judgment.

You’re better than you think you are.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Feels risky

The gulf between “risky” and “feels risky” is huge. And it’s getting bigger.

It turns out that value creation lives in this gap. The things that most people won’t do (because it feels risky) that are in fact not risky at all.

If your compass for forward motion involves avoiding things that feel risky, it pays to get significantly better informed about what actually is risky.

Reblogged from: here