Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Rubbernecking

A traffic jam can teach us quite a lot about human nature.

In the US, when there’s an accident on the side of the road, traffic in the other direction slows down. People voluntarily slow down and look over at the carnage.

This is nuts.

These very same people would never pay money to go to a movie filled with car wrecks that hurt real people. And yet, they do it from their car. It turns out we’re very interested in things that are happening in real time, right next to us.

Not only that, but the jam created by this voluntarily slowdown can last for an hour or more. And yet, when it’s your turn, when you get to the front of the line, instead of saying, “well, I got punished for the bad behavior of the 1,000 people ahead of me, I’m going to fix that and speed up now,” we say, “hey, I paid my dues, my turn to look…”

And of course, the nature of variance means that human-controlled cars on the highway have to go much slower when they are closer together. And so the slowdown ripples backwards, because instead of leaving plenty of space so that they can all speed up quickly, we inch together, ensuring that the jam will take even longer.

Every time you think that the human beings you seek to serve are rational, profit-seeking, long-term decision makers, visualize a rubbernecking traffic jam.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Everyone has an accent

The fact that we think the way we speak is normal is the first clue that empathy is quite difficult.

You might also notice how easy it is to notice people who are much worse at driving than you are–but that you almost never recognize someone who’s driving better than you are.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

“What does this remind you of?”

That’s a much more useful way to get feedback than asking if we like it.

We make first impressions and long-term judgments based on the smallest of clues. We scan before we dive in, we see the surface before we experience the substance.

And while the emotions that are created by your work aren’t exactly like something else, they rhyme.

It could be your business model, your haircut or the vibrato on your guitar.

“What does this remind you of” opens the door for useful conversations that you can actually do something about. Yes, be original, but no, it’s not helpful to be so original that we have no idea what you’re doing.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Yes, there’s a free lunch

In a physical economy in which scarcity is the fundamental driver, eating lunch means someone else gets less.

But in a society where ideas lead to trust and connection and productivity, where working together is better than working apart, where exchange creates value for both sides…

Then the efficient sharing of ideas is its own free lunch.

All of us are smarter than any of us, so the value to all goes up when you share.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

What is and what might be

They have much less in common than you might expect.

The key step in creating a better future is insisting that it not be based on the assumptions, grievances and dead ends of the past.

The future won’t be perfect. We won’t be perfect. But we can be kind. We can listen. We can give opportunity the benefit of the doubt.

The future won’t always work. We won’t always succeed. But we can be alert and seek out the possible instead of the predicted.

The future won’t always be fair. But we can try. We can care. We can choose to connect.

It can be better if we let it.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

When your ideas get stolen

A few meditations:

Good for you. Isn’t it better that your ideas are worth stealing? What would happen if you worked all that time, created that book or that movie or that concept and no one wanted to riff on it, expand it or run with it? Would that be better?

You’re not going to run out of ideas. In fact, the more people grab your ideas and make magic with them, the more of a vacuum is sitting in your outbox, which means you will prompted to come up with even more ideas, right?

Ideas that spread win. They enrich our culture, create connection and improve our lives. Isn’t that why you created your idea in the first place?

The goal isn’t credit. The goal is change.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Make believe problems

We focus on them and elevate them on our priority list.

Sometimes, we invent a fake problem and give it great import and urgency as a way to take our focus and fear away from the thing that’s actually a threat. These fake problems have no apparent solution, but at least they give us something to fret over, a way to distract ourselves and the people around us.

And sometimes, we pick a fake problem that has a convenient and easy fake solution. Because, the thinking goes, we’re taking action, so things must be getting better.

Short order cooks rarely make change happen. And denying reality doesn’t make it go away.

Reblogged from: here