Self-Realisation

Synchronize your watches

Time zones are a recent invention. It used to be that local time was different everywhere. Each village had its own high noon.

Factories required synchronization, so that workers would all show up at the same time (which probably led to the alarm clock’s invention as well).

Today, of course, two things have happened:

Everyone knows what time it is, all the time. Precisely the same time, to the second.
It matters less. More work is asynchronous. The work itself now tells you when to start working on it, as the project is passed from desk to desk, from account to account.
Work is no longer time-based. It’s now project based.

Act accordingly.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

Stretching

There are two polar opposites: Staying still and Breaking. It’s easy to visualize each end of the axis, whatever the activity.

In between is stretching.

Stretching is growth. Extending our reach. Becoming more resilient, limber and powerful. Stretching hurts a bit, and maybe leaves us just a little bit sore.

But then, tomorrow, we can stretch further than we could yesterday. Because stretching compounds.

If you’re afraid of breaking, the answer isn’t to stay still. No, if you’re afraid of breaking, the answer is to dedicate yourself to stretching.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Learning from the factory/dealer divide

Car factories are a bit of a miracle. They make a complex, expensive device, and they do it close to perfectly. People love their cars, and regularly buy new ones long before they need to. It’s a largely solved engineering problem.

On the other hand, car dealerships are a disaster. No one likes them. They’re scammy, stressful and unpredictable.

The difference comes down to management vs. leadership.

Car factories are measured and managed. For a hundred years, stopwatches and spreadsheets have turned the process of making a car into a predictable, improvable system. Management is an act of authority and compliance, and in the controlled setting of a factory, it works.

Car dealers might try to measure the easy metrics of output (how many sold) but they’ve consistently failed at managing the improvised human interactions that car salespeople engage in. It turns out that the few great car dealers are great because of leadership, not management. Leadership is engaged with voluntarily, an enrolled engagement around meaning and manners, not process and motion.

Most of us don’t work in a factory. Most of us aren’t trying to solve an engineering problem. On our best days, we are leaders, or we are led by humans worthy of our best selves.

Leadership is difficult work, as far from a solvable engineering problem as we’ll encounter. It’s easier, though, if we realize that that’s what we’re doing.

When you run your dealership like a factory, you’re not going to succeed, nor are you going to please your staff. This is what creates senseless and humanity-starved bureaucracies.

The alternative:

Hire the right people, walk away from those that aren’t on the journey.

Gain enrollment.

Model behaviors.

Celebrate the right contributions.

Develop a culture, a language, a way of being on the path.

Commit to the journey.

People like us do things like this.

Raise the standards, repeat the process.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

How far behind?

Should you give up?

There are people who have read far more books than you have, and you will certainly never catch up.

Your website began with lousy traffic stats, in fact, they all do. Should you even bother?

The course you’re in–you’re a few lessons behind the leaders. Time to call it quits?

Quitting merely because you’re behind is a trap, a form of hiding that feels safe, but isn’t. The math is simple: whatever you switch to because you quit is another place you’re going to be behind as well.

It’s not a race, it’s a journey. And the team that scores first doesn’t always win.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The two simple secrets to good ideas

Secret #1 is the biggest one: More bad ideas. The more bad ideas the better. If you work really hard on coming up with bad ideas, sooner or later, some good ideas are going to slip through. This is much easier than the opposite approach.

Secret #2 is more important: Generosity. It’s much easier and more effective to come up with good ideas for someone else. Much easier to bring a posture of insight and care on behalf of someone else. It lets you off the hook, too.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

“Are you in a hurry?”

That’s what the sign at the airport cafe said.

It’s clearly a state of mind. Everyone at the airport is in one of two states: in a hurry, or killing time. The absolute number isn’t relevant–it doesn’t matter how many minutes until the flight that they’re expecting to catch. What matters is their state.

The same thing is true for someone on a commute, or a creative person at work.

You’re either in a hurry (with all the negative and positive that this state entails) or you’re not.

At the airport, people in a hurry are stressed, distracted and no more likely to make their flight.

At work, on the other hand, people in a hurry avoid getting sidetracked and (sometimes) are more likely to leap.

The two opportunities:

redefine “in a hurry” to be a version of your best self. So that “hurry” isn’t a crutch, an excuse or a bane. It’s an asset.
Turn on “hurry” whenever you need it, and turn it off when you don’t.

Reblogged from: here