Self-Realisation

How cold is the turkey?

If your customers had to stop using your product or service tomorrow, how much would they miss it?

How easy are you to replace?

How deep are the habits, how essential are the interactions?

Being missed when you’re gone is a worthy objective.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

Failsafe tip

The last thing to add to an important email is the email address.

Write the thing, save it as a draft, and, an hour later, put the email address in and then hit send.

It’s not clear that you should send an important text, but if you’re going to, write it in a notes app, then copy, paste and send.

Send it when you’re ready, not before.

There’s no ‘recall’ button.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The pre-mortem

If you want us to take your new proposal seriously, consider including a pre mortem.

Include a detailed analysis of why your project might fail.

Specific weak spots, individuals who need to come on board, assumptions that might not be true…

If you’ve got a track record of successfully predicting specific points of failure before they happen, we’re a lot more likely to trust your judgment next time.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Making it political

The difference between an actual discussion (where we seek the right answer) and a political one is simple:

In a political discussion, people don’t care about what’s correct or effective or true. Facts aren’t the point.

The honest answer to, “if it could be demonstrated that there’s a more effective or just solution to this problem, would you change your mind?” is, for a political question, “no.”

It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about the the local water tower, the death penalty, labor unions, euthanasia, fair trade, organic food, the EPA or carbon. In political discussions, we don’t have enrollment in the scientific method. We’re not open to effectiveness or proof. We’re engaged in a tribal conflict.

The problem with the fencing in of one topic after another as political is that it gives us less and less space to learn and grow and understand.

Think tanks in DC call themselves non-partisan. But of course, that’s not true, because they’ve already made up their minds. They’re not thinking at all. Merely arguing.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

First, fast and correct

All three would be great.

First… you invent, design, develop and bring to life things that haven’t been done before.

Fast… you get the work done quickly and efficiently.

Correct… and it’s right the first time, without preventable errors.

Being first takes guts. Being fast takes training. And being correct takes care.

All three at once is rare. Two would be great. And just one (any one) is required if you want to be a professional.

Alas, too often, in our confusion about priorities and our fear of shipping, we end up doing none and settling for average instead.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

On one foot

Smartphones can hobble us. They connect us, and do it with persistence, drip by drip. But they also push us to make everything fit on a very small screen for a very short time.

Teaching complicated ideas to people on a phone is like trying to teach geography to a bunch of sugared-up kids who just had a triple espresso, while they are standing on one foot being bitten by a swarm of mosquitos.

There could be a direct correlation between smart phone usage and underinformed mass behavior.

Sometimes it’s worth opening up a laptop and slowing down just a bit.

Yes, opening up a laptop might count as slowing down a bit.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Throat clearing isn’t necessary

Begin in the middle.

The first paragraph, where you lay out what’s about to happen. The half-apology you use to preface your comments at the meeting. The email that takes a paragraph or two to get to the point…

You can skip those.

Throat clearing is a good way to make sure that people are looking at you. And an even better way to give yourself time to collect your thoughts, to indulge your fears or to get yourself warmed up.

But we’re already looking at you. We’ve clicked through to your link, given you the microphone, read your note…

Say all that stuff in your head, but, we’d really like to hear the best part first.

Begin in the middle.

Reblogged from: here