Self-Realisation

How cold is the turkey?

If your customers had to stop using your product or service tomorrow, how much would they miss it?

How easy are you to replace?

How deep are the habits, how essential are the interactions?

Being missed when you’re gone is a worthy objective.

Reblogged from: here

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Media out of balance

Successful media (let’s define ‘successful’ as media that can make a difference, make a connection and possibly make a living) has four elements:

Attention

Enrollment

Trust and

Permission

Too often, particularly online, people just worry about the first one.

It’s a race to go viral, to go low, to make a bunch of noise. The quick hit, the shortcut, the inflammation.

But attention is insufficient.

Enrollment means that your audience wants to go where you’re going.

Trust earns you the benefit of the doubt.

And permission means you don’t have to begin from scratch every time. You’ve earned some attention. The privilege of delivering anticipated, personal and relevant messages over time.

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Self-Realisation

Failsafe tip

The last thing to add to an important email is the email address.

Write the thing, save it as a draft, and, an hour later, put the email address in and then hit send.

It’s not clear that you should send an important text, but if you’re going to, write it in a notes app, then copy, paste and send.

Send it when you’re ready, not before.

There’s no ‘recall’ button.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The pre-mortem

If you want us to take your new proposal seriously, consider including a pre mortem.

Include a detailed analysis of why your project might fail.

Specific weak spots, individuals who need to come on board, assumptions that might not be true…

If you’ve got a track record of successfully predicting specific points of failure before they happen, we’re a lot more likely to trust your judgment next time.

Reblogged from: here

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Ringing vs wringing

Ringing is resonant. A small force causes sympathetic vibrations, and magic happens.

Wringing requires significant effort and can even destroy the object it is applied to.

When you ring a bell for your clients, you’ve delivered with care and empathy.

But when you seek to wring every dollar out of a transaction, you’ve probably engaged for the last time.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Making it political

The difference between an actual discussion (where we seek the right answer) and a political one is simple:

In a political discussion, people don’t care about what’s correct or effective or true. Facts aren’t the point.

The honest answer to, “if it could be demonstrated that there’s a more effective or just solution to this problem, would you change your mind?” is, for a political question, “no.”

It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about the the local water tower, the death penalty, labor unions, euthanasia, fair trade, organic food, the EPA or carbon. In political discussions, we don’t have enrollment in the scientific method. We’re not open to effectiveness or proof. We’re engaged in a tribal conflict.

The problem with the fencing in of one topic after another as political is that it gives us less and less space to learn and grow and understand.

Think tanks in DC call themselves non-partisan. But of course, that’s not true, because they’ve already made up their minds. They’re not thinking at all. Merely arguing.

Reblogged from: here