Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Speakerphone voice

When the speakerphone is on in the conference room, do you talk differently?

It’s pretty common.

We breathe from a different spot, hold our chest differently, constrict our throats and generally try to shout our words across the ocean.

The people listening on the speaker are used to it. The people in the room with you, less so.

Human beings don’t have a long cultural history with microphones. We don’t instinctively understand that they actually work. So we shout instead. And shouting changes how we’re believed, trusted and ultimately heard.

Learning to use a microphone is a great skill. When you speak normally, it turns out that the microphone has plenty of volts, watts and amps on hand to move your voice all the way to Latvia if you want it to. And then your words will actually be heard.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Been done before

What percentage of the work you do each day is work where the process (the ‘right answer’) is known? Jobs where you replicate a process instead of inventing one…

The place where we can create the most value is when we do a job where exploration and a new solution is what’s needed. Not rote, but exploration. Which means we’re doing something that’s not been done before, something that might not work.

This isn’t something to avoid, it’s the work we need to seek out.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Outsiders

You can’t have insiders unless you have outsiders.

And you can’t have winners unless you have losers.

That doesn’t mean that you’re required to create insiders and winners. All it means is that when people begin to measure themselves only in comparison to others (“How did I rank?”) then you need to accept the impact of those choices.

It’s entirely possible to be happy and engaged and productive without creating this dynamic. But in a culture based on scarcity, it’s often easier to award or deduct points and to keep a scoreboard instead.

reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The confusion about competence

A friend was describing a clerk he had recently dealt with. “She was competent, of course, but she couldn’t engage very well with the customer who just came in.”

Then, of course, she wasn’t competent, was she?

It doesn’t take a genius to see that competence is no longer about our ability to press certain buttons in a certain sequence. Far more often, competence involves the humanity required to connect with other people, in real time.

It requires emotional labor, not merely compliance.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

The boss goes first

If you want to build a vibrant organizational culture, or govern with authority, or create a social dynamic that’s productive and fair, the simple rule is: the rules apply to people in power before they are applied to those without.

It’s easy to rationalize the alternative, to put yourself first. After all, you’ve somehow earned the authority to make an exception for yourself.

But when we avoid that temptation and expose ourselves to the rules first, obey the rules first and make the sacrifices first, our culture is more likely to stick.

The rules that matter the most are the ones about behavior, transparency and accountability.

People might hear what you say, but they always remember what you do.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

The problem with high expectations…

is that nothing will ever be good enough.

But the alternative, low expectations, is sad indeed.

The internet (like life) will always disappoint us. It will always be too flaky, too slow, too insulated. It will always have errors, hate and stupidity. And we had such high hopes, the promise was so big.

This is true of just about everything, and it opens the door to the realization that we can be brokenhearted or we can use those high hopes as fuel to make the next cycle even better.

Some people persist on grading themselves on a curve, ensuring that they’ll never be disappointed in what they create or in the opportunities they pass by. It’s a form of hiding, not an accurate insight into what you’re capable of. You deserve better than that.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Persistent stability

Investment hates chaos.

Before an organization invests in a new technology, a new machine or a new process, it needs to believe two things:

That the problem being solved is going to be around for awhile if it’s not addressed.
That the world will be stable long enough to earn back the investment.
That’s why a consistent, civil and stable government matters so much. And why industries often wait to leap into a new technology. Before there are any conversations at all about ROI, decision makers need to feel safe, safe enough to believe that there will a future that matches their expectations.

Reblogged from: here