Uncategorized

Waste and the new luxury

Luxury goods are built on a foundation of waste. Using the center cut. Extra effort, often unseen. More space, more resources, more energy than is needed.

The front lawn is a luxury good, a sign that you don’t need to graze your cows on every square inch, and that you’re willing to waste the lawn. And the few bits of leather good enough to go into that luxury handbag sends a message about your ability to walk away from all the other parts of the hide.

There’s a new luxury that’s occurring, though, one that’s based on efficiency. Saving you time, sure, but also the time and resources of the creator. A luxury that’s based on investing in renewables, in resources that might be seen as endless, in smart design, in the satisfaction of knowing that others are benefitting, not paying, for the experience or the object you’re buying.

Reblogged from: here

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Uncategorized

Kindness Scales

It scales better than competitiveness, frustration, pettiness, regret, revenge, merit (whatever that means) or apathy.

Kindness ratchets up. It leads to more kindness. It can create trust and openness and truth and enthusiasm and patience and possibility.

Kindness, in one word, is a business model, an approach to strangers and a platform for growth.

It might take more effort than you were hoping it would, but it’s worth it.

Reblogged from: here

Uncategorized

Are you day trading?

The volatility of bitcoin turns the people who own it into addicts. At any given moment, it’s up $100 or down a thousand.

When it’s up, you think you’re brilliant, that you somehow had something to do with it.

And when it’s down, the world is about to implode.

Most people don’t day trade bitcoin, but all of us day trade something. We’re hooked into something volatile, easily measured and emotional. We overdo our response to news, good or bad, and let it distract us from the long-term job of living a useful life.

Your SEO results, your Facebook likes, the look on your boss’s face when she gets back from a meeting–all of these things are rife with opportunities for day trading.

It’ll be volatile with or without your help. Better to set it aside and get back to the real work of making a difference instead.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

New Habits

I bought a CD yesterday.

That didn’t used to be news. I used to buy a CD every week, week after week, year after year. It adds up.

Hi-rez streaming changed that habit for me, but it took about a year before the itch (mostly) subsided.

Old habits die hard, and it’s entirely possible that your customers are on fumes, buying your old stuff now and then, down from often and on their way to rarely.

You can live on old habits for a while, but the future depends on investing in finding and building some new ones with (and for) your customers. Or your family. Or yourself.

The most powerful insight is that you can do it with intent. You can decide that you want some new habits, and then go get them.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

Granularity

You can’t make an hourglass with a boulder.

But break the boulder into sufficiently small bits of sand, and you can tell time.

You wouldn’t want to eat a baked loaf of ice cream, mustard, fish, bread, capers and cheese.

But separate them into their component parts and you can open a restaurant.

It’s tempting indeed to build the one, the one perfect thing, here it is, it’s for everyone.

But one size rarely fits all.

The alternative is break it into components, to find the grid and to fill it in. Not too small, not too big. Grains that match what we’re ready to engage with.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

“We don’t do rabbits”

One thing that’s often taught in amateur internet marketing school is the idea of keyword stuffing.

List every possible thing that someone might want you to do on your website, so if they type that in, they’ll find you.

It’s an echo of something that freelancers and small businesses have been doing forever, “what do you need?” as an answer to the question, “what do you do?”

I was at the vet a few years ago, and he was busy trying to fix a rabbit. He’s a good vet, but how many rabbits does he actually get to treat? I think everyone would have been happier if he had announced that the client should have taken her pet to a rabbit specialist.

You might be as well.

Good referrals are smarter than mediocre, distracting work.

Own your work. No need to do someone else’s.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation, Uncategorized

What sort of performance?

It’s not unusual for something to be positioned as the high-performance alternative. The car that can go 0 to 60 in three seconds, the corkscrew that’s five times faster, the punch press that’s incredibly efficient…

The thing is, though, that the high performance vs. low-performance debate misses something. High at what?

That corkscrew that’s optimized for speed is more expensive, more difficult to operate and requires more maintenance.

That car that goes so fast is also more difficult to drive, harder to park and generally a pain in the neck to live with.

You may find that a low-performance alternative is exactly what you need to actually get your work done. Which is the highest performance you can hope for.

Reblogged from: here