Self-Realisation

What will you do with your surplus?

If you have a safe place to sleep, reasonable health and food in the fridge, you’re probably living with a surplus. You have enough breathing room to devote an hour to watching TV, or having an argument you don’t need to have, or simply messing around online. You have time and leverage and technology and trust.

For many people, this surplus is bigger than any human on Earth could have imagined just a hundred years ago.

What will you spend it on?

If you’re not drowning, you’re a lifeguard.

Reblogged from: here

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Self-Realisation

Decision making, after the fact

Critics are eager to pick apart complex decisions made by others.

Prime Ministers, CEOs, even football coaches are apparently serially incompetent. If they had only listened to folks who knew precisely what they should have done, they would have been far better off.

Of course, these critics have a great deal of trouble making less-complex decisions in their own lives. They carry the wrong credit cards, buy the wrong stocks, invest in the wrong piece of real estate.

Some of them even have trouble deciding what to eat for dinner.

Complex decision making is a skill—it can be learned, and some people are significantly better at it than others. It involves instinct, without a doubt, but also the ability to gather information that seems irrelevant, to ignore information that seems urgent, to patiently consider not just the short-term but the long-term implications.

The loudest critics have poor track records in every one of these areas.

Mostly, making good decisions involves beginning with a commitment to make a decision. That’s the hard part. Choosing the best possible path is only possible after you’ve established that you’ve got the guts and the commitment to make a decision.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Stuntvertising

The math has changed.

It used to be, you paid money to run an ad. A little piece of media, bought and paid for. The audience came with the slot.

Today, of course, the ad is free to run. Post your post, upload your video. Free.

What to measure, then?

Well, one thing to measure is attention. How many likes or shares or views did it get?

But if you’re going to optimize for attention, not trust or results or contribution, then you’re on a very dangerous road.

It’s pretty easy to get attention by running down the street naked (until everyone else does it). But that’s not going to accomplish your goals.

When Oreo gets attention for a tweet or Halotop for a horrible ad, they’re pulling a stunt, not contributing to their mission.

Yes, the alternative is more difficult. It doesn’t come with a quick hit or big numbers. But it understands what it’s for. An effective ad is far more valuable than a much-noticed one.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Date certain

Some work is best shipped when it’s done.

Most of the time, though, we produce useful, important work on time. When it’s due.

If you’re having trouble shipping, it might because you’ve hesitated to put a date on it. “Soon” is a very different concept than, “11:00 am”.

If it’s important enough to spend your day on, to pin your dreams on, to promise to yourself and others, it’s probably important enough to guarantee a ship date.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Degrees of freedom

All you have to do is look around to realize just how many choices we still have. What to eat, who to speak to, what to do for a living, what to learn, what to say, who to contribute to, how we interact, what we stand for…

The safe and comfortable path is to pretend that we’re blocked at every turn.

But most of the turns, we don’t even see. We’ve trained ourselves to ignore them.

A habit is not the same as no choice. And a choice isn’t often easy. In fact, the best ones rarely are.

But we can still choose to make one.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Important, popular or viral

Important work is easily dismissed by the audience. It involves change and risk and thought.
Popular work resonates with the people who already like what you do.
Viral work is what happens when the audience can’t stop talking about what you did.
Every once in awhile, all three things will co-exist, but odds are, you’re going to need to choose.

Reblogged from: here

Self-Realisation

Money for nothing

A friend asked me for some ways to make money. (All direct quotes).

“Can I do okay taking those surveys where they pay me?”

“What about buying or trading shirts from Supreme and then selling them?”

“Do you think I can get paid $50 an hour to be a dog walker?”

“Is listening to some famous person and investing in an ICO a shortcut to riches?”

The thing is, almost all the easy shortcuts are taken. And the problem is that the ones that aren’t taken are hiding really well among a forest of scams and ripoffs. [Please read this before you invest in any ICO or Bitcoin-related offering. Run away!]

Or how about,

“How can I get an agent for my screenplay,” or

“Where do I find a publisher who will pay me a big advance for my first novel?”

Your best work isn’t nothing, it’s the heart of what you have to offer. Finding the long, difficult way is worth the journey, because it’s the best way to get what you deserve.

Reblogged from: here